Acorn Stamper

Purpose:

This activity promotes pincer grasp and visual motor skills by creating and decorating an acorn shape.

Skills: Bilateral Hand Use(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Cutting, Fine Motor Control, Finger Strength, Finger Translation, Grasp, Hand Dexterity, In-hand Manipulation, Motor Planning(?) Motor planning is the ability to assess a motor activity, plan and organize how to carry out that motor activity, and finally implement motor skills to achieve that motor activity. Motor planning leads to the ability to carry out a motor skill automatically after enough practice., Pincer Control(?) Motor planning is the ability to assess a motor activity, plan and organize how to carry out that motor activity, and finally implement motor skills to achieve that motor activity. Motor planning leads to the ability to carry out a motor skill automatically after enough practice., Pincer Grasp(?) The pincer grasp is the coordination of the index finger and thumb to hold an item. Each time you hold a pen or button your shirt, you’re using the pincer grasp. Pincer grasp is a hand grasp that develops around the time a baby is 8-10 months old. This grasp corresponds to the time a baby is beginning to feed themselves finger foods. The pincer grasp is needed in order to grasp a small item, pinch it between the index and thumb and bring it to the mouth., Sensory Processing, Tactile Perception(?) Tactile Perception (sometimes referred to as touch perception) is the brain's ability to understand (perceive) what the hands are feeling., Tripod Grasp, Visual Motor

Draw an acorn on the construction paper (see images for example) or you can let the child trace an acorn stencil to promote fine motor control and visual-motor skills.

Let the child cut the acorn shape using scissors.

Using a piece of small sponge instruct the child to pinch it and dip it into the paint then stamp and paint the bottom part of the acorn cut out. You can also use q-tips or cotton balls to paint.

Encourage the child to fill in the entire bottom part of the acorn.

Have the child spread glue on the top part of the acorn.

Provide the child with a few dry leaves. Instruct the child to crumble the leaves inside the palm of his hand and then spread them on the glue. This will promote finger strength and finger translation.

You may also use beans to cover the top area of the acorn.

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