Fingerprint Turkey

For this activity, you will need washable tempera paint or finger paint in 4 colors (e.g. yellow, red, pink, and brown).

Ask the child to dip the tip of the thumb into the brown color and press the thumb onto the paper twice. Thumbprints should be one next to the other. This will be the body of the turkey.

Ask the child to dip the tip of the index finger into the pink color and add a row of pink fingerprints above the brown ones. This will be the feathers.

Ask the child to add more rows of fingerprints (feathers) in yellow and red colors.

Glue the wiggle eyes to the brown turkey body. Add feet using the markers or crayons.

Fall Crunchy Art

Gather dry leaves.

Use both hands to crunch the dry leaves into smaller pieces. This helps promote bilateral hand use, tactile perception, and auditory input.

On a piece of construction paper, use glue to create a shape or drawing. We choose the heart shape but you can use a smiley face, a house shape, letters, numbers, etc. Working on grading the force on the glue bottle addresses the proprioceptive system.

Transfer the crunched dry leaves pieces onto the construction paper covering the wet glue shape.

Let dry for a few minutes and shake off the leaves that remained unglued.

Use markers to decorate.

Roll, Crawl, and Jump

Rolling cropped

Place the apples (or any other objects) on one end of the room.

Instruct the child to pick up one apple and lay flat on the ground or on a blanket.

Ask the child to roll 5 times, crawl through the tunnel, and jump 10 times on the trampoline, then put the apple in the basket.

Support your child by monitoring his arousal level, as vestibular input can be alerting. Start slow, take breaks as needed, ask the child if he wants to continue or stop and if needed add proprioception input.

Modifications

If you don’t have a tunnel, you can have your child crawl under the table or just on the ground.

If you don’t have a trampoline, ask the child to jump over a pillow or just jump in place.

Paper Chain

Colorful Paper Chain

Draw 5-6 straight lines on different color sheets of construction paper.

Let the child cut along the lines to create long construction paper strips.

Glue the construction paper strips together the ends to create a circle.

Connect the circles together and make chains.

Playdough Therapy Treasure

For this activity, you can use pegs, beans, beads, coins, and small toys.

Hide the small objects in the playdough and ask the child to dig his fingers in and search for the hidden treasure.

Encourage the child to stretch the playdough and work his fingers in.

When the child finds the treasure, ask him to take the object out using his thumb and pointer to promote pincer grasp.

If using pegs, you can use the pegboard and have the child design a picture on the board or you can ask him to draw lines, shapes, or letters.

If you choose to use beads you can have the child lace them on a string and make a necklace.

Acorn Stamper

Acorn Stamp

Draw an acorn on the construction paper (see images for example) or you can let the child trace an acorn stencil to promote fine motor control and visual-motor skills.

Let the child cut the acorn shape using scissors.

Using a piece of small sponge instruct the child to pinch it and dip it into the paint then stamp and paint the bottom part of the acorn cut out. You can also use q-tips or cotton balls to paint.

Encourage the child to fill in the entire bottom part of the acorn.

Have the child spread glue on the top part of the acorn.

Provide the child with a few dry leaves. Instruct the child to crumble the leaves inside the palm of his hand and then spread them on the glue. This will promote finger strength and finger translation.

You may also use beans to cover the top area of the acorn.

Ice Painting

Put a small amount of paint on a sheet of construction paper.

Let the child hold an ice cube using the thumb, index finger, and middle finger only.

Have the child move the ice cube over the paint and spread it on the paper.

You may also use powder paint for this activity.

You can use the Colored Ice Cubes activity to make the ice cubes for this activity.

Thumb Opposition with Finger Paint

Paint

For this activity, you will work on thumb opposition and provide sensory input by using finger paint.

You should use 5 different colors of finger paint.

Pour the different finger paint colors into the paper plate.

Ask the child to dip each finger in each one of the colors. Provide help as needed.

Draw a pattern on the construction paper. For example draw a pattern like a blue dot, a green dot, a red dot, a blue dot, a green dot, a red dot, etc.

Ask the child to follow your pattern using the paint on his/her fingers.

You can also have the child mix the colors and create new colors by touching his/her thumb with any other finger (i.e. thumb to the pointer, thumb to the middle finger, and so on) to work on and promote thumb opposition.

Can You Feel It

Fill up a large container or a bucket with beans, rice, macaroni, sand, or birdseeds (you can mix a few media together if you wish to).

Let the child put his/her hands in the container and pour, sift or move the media from side to side.

When using bird seeds it is recommended to powder the child’s hands with some baby powder to keep the birdseeds from sticking to the palms of the hands.

Mixing small plastic shapes, plastic letters and numbers, small plastic animals and any other educationally related items in the media can be a fun way for the child to develop his/her stereognosis sense.

Tactile Paint

For this activity, use a gallon size Ziplock bag.

Place approximately 1/2 cup of tempera paint in the ziplock bag, remove air and seal. Work the paint around until it filled the bag.

Have child make lines, shapes or letters by moving his finger along outside of the bag.

As an alternative, you can use shaving cream mixed with food coloring instead of the tempera paint.