Fall Leaves

Purpose:

This fall activity promotes pincer grasp by using tongs to move and glue leaves across midline.

Skills: Bilateral Hand Use(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Crossing Midline(?) The ability to move ones hands, feet, and eyes not only together, but across and to the other side of the body., Cutting(?) The ability to move ones hands, feet, and eyes not only together, but across and to the other side of the body., Fine Motor Control(?) The ability to move ones hands, feet, and eyes not only together, but across and to the other side of the body., Finger Strength(?) The ability to move ones hands, feet, and eyes not only together, but across and to the other side of the body., Grasp, Motor Planning(?) Motor planning is the ability to assess a motor activity, plan and organize how to carry out that motor activity, and finally implement motor skills to achieve that motor activity. Motor planning leads to the ability to carry out a motor skill automatically after enough practice., Pincer Grasp(?) The pincer grasp is the coordination of the index finger and thumb to hold an item. Each time you hold a pen or button your shirt, you’re using the pincer grasp. Pincer grasp is a hand grasp that develops around the time a baby is 8-10 months old. This grasp corresponds to the time a baby is beginning to feed themselves finger foods. The pincer grasp is needed in order to grasp a small item, pinch it between the index and thumb and bring it to the mouth., Tripod Grasp, Visual Perception

Use a brown construction paper and draw a rectangle to be used as the tree’s trunk.

Let the child cut out the rectangle to promote visual motor skills.

Ask the child to glue the brown rectangle on piece of white construction paper.

Using the crayons or markers, have the child draw a few branches coming out of the trunk of the tree on the white construction paper.

Instruct the child to mark a few dots using the glue on each branch.

Place some leaves on the table on the child’s non dominant side.

Provide the child with tweezers or tongs and have him catch one leaf at a time and move across the midline to place it on top of a glue dots.

Repeat until all leaves are glued on the tree.

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