Beads for All

Purpose:

This fun activity works on the small muscles of the hand and promotes pincer grasp.

Skills: Bilateral Hand Use(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Distal Finger Control(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Finger Translation(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Hand Arches/Separation(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., In-hand Manipulation(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Intrinsic Muscle Development(?) The use of both hands simultaneously, in a controlled manner, to perform an activity (i.e. clapping hands, using your one hand to hold a pencil while the other is used to stabilize the paper)., Pincer Grasp(?) The pincer grasp is the coordination of the index finger and thumb to hold an item. Each time you hold a pen or button your shirt, you’re using the pincer grasp. Pincer grasp is a hand grasp that develops around the time a baby is 8-10 months old. This grasp corresponds to the time a baby is beginning to feed themselves finger foods. The pincer grasp is needed in order to grasp a small item, pinch it between the index and thumb and bring it to the mouth.
Materials: Beads, Lace

Provide the child with different size beads and encourage him to use only his thumb and index finger to pick up one bead at a time.

The child strings the beads using his dominant hand to manipulate the lace and his non-dominant hand to hold the bead.

You want to make sure the child does not stabilize his arms on the table or push his elbows into the sides of his body for stabilization.

Remember that stabilization should occur at the shoulders and make sure the elbows are a couple of inches away from the trunk.

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