Squeeze this Puffy Paint

Puffy Painting

For this activity, you will need to use flour, salt, and water to add to the puffy paint.

In a mixing bowl mix an equal amount of flour, salt, and water.

Add the paint and mix well.

Fill the squeeze bottle with the paint mixture and let the child squeeze the puffy paint onto cardboard to create a picture.

When dry, the paint becomes hard and shiny.

To work on visual motor skills you can have the child imitate or copy different strokes, shapes or letters.

Running Water

Place two containers or buckets on opposite sides of the room or the area you play at.

Fill up one of the containers with water.

You may add food coloring if you wish.

Have the child transfer the water from one container to the other using a squeeze bottle or an eyedropper.

Leveled Cup

Fill the empty water bottle with colored water using food coloring.

Use different color masking tape or markers to mark water levels on the paper cups.

Make sure to mark the levels on the higher side. This will help achieve full forearm pronation.

Ask the child to take the filled bottle and fill the cups up until the water reaches the marker.

Encourage proper pronation of the wrist while filling the paper cups.

For grading, use a squirt bottle to work on finger strengthening as the child is squeezing the water out of the bottle to fill up the cups.

Squirt Till it Drops

Fill up the bucket/container with water to the midline and drop in the Ping-Pong ball (you can use more than one ball, or different size plastic balls). Fill up the squirt bottle with water and let the child squeeze and squirt the water out into the bucket/container until the Ping-Pong ball falls out of the bucket/container.

This activity can be done with more than one child. The first child that has his/her Ping-Pong ball fall out of the bucket/container wins!

To work on developing visual motor skills, fill up the squirt bottle with shaving cream or foam and let the child squeeze the bottle to draw shapes and letters on a concrete surface or an easel.

Textured Paper Painting

Draw (or depending on the child’s developmental skills, have the child trace or independently draw) a large rectangle on the paper bag (use the blank side if the paper bag has a design or picture on it) and ask the child to cut it out.

Fill the squirt bottle with water and have the child spray water all over the cut out rectangle. Encourage the child to utilize his thumb, index finger, and middle finger to press on the handle of the squirt bottle. Once the paper is moist, ask the child to use both hands and squeeze the paper into a little ball (have him squeeze as much as possible and drain out as much liquid as possible).

Then, ask the child to open up the paper and use both hands to flatten the paper back to a rectangle shape.

Allow the paper to dry up before you start drawing or painting on it. For a rough texture, let the paper dry on a flat surface in the sun. For a smoother texture, you can place the paper between to flat heavy objects.

Once the paper is dry, have the child use markers to draw the outline of the desired picture and use the paint to paint it. To work on pre-writing skills, you can outline lines and/or letters and have the child paint them.

To promote sensory processing and tactile perception, you can have the child use the paper with a rough texture and paint with finger paint.

Melting Rainbow

Using the markers or chalk, have the child color a rainbow or any other drawing appropriate to the child on the dry erase board/easel.

Use the squirt bottle to squirt the board/rainbow with water, the water causes the marker/chalk to run a.k.a. melt the rainbow.

Note: this activity would work best outside as it can get quite messy.