Ballgown Jewlery

This activity was inspired by our kiddo’s favorite princess, whose fairy godmother transformed a pumpkin to take her to a ball in a beautiful ballgown, with sparkling jewelry, and glass slippers.

Step 1: Place toy jewelry into each slot of an ice tray. You may use pieces of beaded-necklaces, toy diamonds or toy earrings. Ensure safety by eliminating choking hazards and supervising children at all times.
Step 2: Pour water into the ice tray.
Step 3: Freeze.
Step 4: Remove from the freezer and place the jewelry-filled ice cubes into a bowl.
Step 5: Squeeze a squirt bottle filled with water to melt ice cubes. You may add food coloring for an additional visual effect.
Step 6: Melt the ice cube until the jewelry is set free.
Step 7: Scoop the jewelry out with a spoon or scooping utensil to practice self-feeding skills.
Step 8: Count your sparkling pieces of jewelry!

Shoulder Strength Leopard Crawl

Leopard-crawl under table

The leopard crawl is a military type-specific crawl that can increase shoulder strength by using the shoulder muscles to move forward.

Place an empty bucket at one side of the room and give the child a few small size balls (tennis balls, ping pong balls, cotton balls, etc.).

Ask the child to hold one ball in each hand while on his tummy and do a leopard crawl towards the empty bucket. The route to the bucket can go under a table, inside a tunnel, under chairs, or other obstacles for grading.

When the child reaches the bucket, ask the child to put the balls in it and crawl back to the start.

For proper crawl ensure the child is advancing an arm/elbow with the diagonal knee. When an elbow is placed forward, the diagonal knee is also placed forward, and then alternated with the other elbow and knee.

Toss it Catch it

Spread the blanket/towel (it is recommended to use a large towel for this activity) on the ground and ask the child to place the bean bag or a stuffed animal at the center of the blanket.

Have the child stand on one side of the blanket while you stand on the other side of the blanket. Hold on to two corners of the blanket and ask the child to follow you and hold on to the other two corners.

Then, when a cue is given (first given by you and then might be given by the child), both you and the child should lift the blanket and toss the object up in the air.

As the object falls down, try to catch it using the blanket. You can move around to catch the object if needed.

For this activity, you can use more than one bean bag or one stuffed animal. You can also use a tennis ball or a small fabric ball.

The Battle of the Bottles

This activity should be done outdoors and is designed for more than one child.

For each child, fill 3 bottles one-half or two-thirds full with water. Add a couple of tablespoons of oil, a couple of drops of paint, and a handful of sequences. Mark a “START” point and place all the bottles at this point.

Mark an “END” line on the opposite side (you can use a rope, a blanket, or some chairs).

Ask the children to line up at the starting point and pick up a bottle.

On your mark, ask the children to walk as fast as they can, without dropping their bottle, to the endpoint.

Once they get to the end point, have them put their bottle down and walk back to get another bottle.

The first child that transfers all his/her bottles from the starting point to the end point, wins!

Over the Rainbow

Using different colors of construction paper cut a crescent shape from each color.

Place the pieces at one end of the room.

Ask the child to be in the prone position – position of the body is lying face down on the scooter board.

Ask the child to pick up one piece at a time and pull himself forward to the other end of the room.

Then have the child go back while he is sitting on the scooter board to pick up another piece.

Repeat the activity until the child transferred all the pieces and created a picture of a rainbow.

You can also use a rainbow puzzle for this activity.

The child can also use a rope tied to a pole/table to pull himself forward.