Fall Crunchy Art

Gather dry leaves.

Use both hands to crunch the dry leaves into smaller pieces. This helps promote bilateral hand use, tactile perception, and auditory input.

On a piece of construction paper, use glue to create a shape or drawing. We choose the heart shape but you can use a smiley face, a house shape, letters, numbers, etc. Working on grading the force on the glue bottle addresses the proprioceptive system.

Transfer the crunched dry leaves pieces onto the construction paper covering the wet glue shape.

Let dry for a few minutes and shake off the leaves that remained unglued.

Use markers to decorate.

Wheelbarrow Walking

Place a bucket, plastic container, basket, or any other container that could fit a few bean bags in it at the center of the room.

Place bean bags in different corners of the room.

Clear the area for a clear path to all bean bags.

Hold the child’s feet and ask the child to walk on his/her hands (a.k.a wheelbarrow walking).

Help the child to reach the bean bags by wheelbarrow walking towards the bean bags.

When the child reaches a bean bag, ask the child to place the bean bag on the back of the neck (resting between the shoulder blades).

Ask the child to wheelbarrow walk towards the container and drop the bean bag inside.

Repeat these steps until all the bean bags are in the container.

A Day at the Beach Obstacle Course

Obstacle Course

Place towels, sunscreen, hat, ball, bucket, and pail & shovel at one end of the room, or play area.

Place the beach bag/basket on the other end.

Using the tape, mark a trail from the items to the beach bag.

Place the chair, step stool, and pillows (covered with the blanket) along the trail you marked.

Ask the child to transfer one item at a time and place it in the beach bag, following the trail, by crawling under the chair, walking up and down the step-stool (you can also put more than one and have the child go up and down several times), and walking on the blanket-covered pillows.

 

Easter Eggs Match

Cut the construction paper or regular piece of white paper into 6 or more rectangles/cards.

On each card, draw an oval (egg shape) with a line in the middle, to represent the top part of the egg and the bottom part.

Using crayons and marker that match the color of the Easter eggs you are using, color the eggs on the cards, using one color at the top part and a different color at the bottom part.

Present the cards and the “cracked” easter eggs to the child and instruct the child to put the eggs together by matching the colors as shown on the cards.

If using an egg carton, you can ask the child to arrange the matched eggs in the same order the cards are laid on the table.

The Battle of the Bottles

This activity should be done outdoors and is designed for more than one child.

For each child, fill 3 bottles one-half or two-thirds full with water. Add a couple of tablespoons of oil, a couple of drops of paint, and a handful of sequences. Mark a “START” point and place all the bottles at this point.

Mark an “END” line on the opposite side (you can use a rope, a blanket, or some chairs).

Ask the children to line up at the starting point and pick up a bottle.

On your mark, ask the children to walk as fast as they can, without dropping their bottle, to the endpoint.

Once they get to the end point, have them put their bottle down and walk back to get another bottle.

The first child that transfers all his/her bottles from the starting point to the end point, wins!

Over the Rainbow

Using different colors of construction paper cut a crescent shape from each color.

Place the pieces at one end of the room.

Ask the child to be in the prone position – position of the body is lying face down on the scooter board.

Ask the child to pick up one piece at a time and pull himself forward to the other end of the room.

Then have the child go back while he is sitting on the scooter board to pick up another piece.

Repeat the activity until the child transferred all the pieces and created a picture of a rainbow.

You can also use a rainbow puzzle for this activity.

The child can also use a rope tied to a pole/table to pull himself forward.

Proprioceptive Wall Walking

Walking on walls

This quick and simple activity provides proprioceptive input through the feet, ankles, and knees.

Clear space on the wall and the floor in front of the wall.

Ask the child to remove his shoes and lie down on his back.

Position the child with his feet flat against the wall while holding the child’s knees bent in a 90-degree position.

Ask the child to walk his feet up and down the wall.

You can also ask the child to push the wall with his feet or place a foam ball under the child’s feet and push the ball against the wall or into the wall.

Remind the child to take breaks between pushing.

Grading Option

Ask the child to roll a ball with both feet while walking up and down the wall.

Matching Color Cups

– Select four colors of paint to use.
– Put one color on the outside of four different cups so it can be seen & used for matching.
– Take the rest of your cups and put various colored dots on the inside bottom of the cup.

To play the game:
– All the cups are turned upside down so the colors inside cannot be seen.
– The child has to pick up the cup, turn it over (supination) to see what color is on the bottom of the cup, then find the matching cup with the paint on the outside and stack it on top using pronation to turn the cup over again.

This works well seated on a scooter board as well:
– Place one cup of each color at one end of the room and the rest of the cups at the other end and have the child bring one cup at a time over to stack it on the matching pile.

Replace paint with markers, crayons, or stamps.

Birthday Cake

Pretend the play-doh is the dough to make your cake. To develop hand strength and increase joint compression have the child roll, and push flat with both hands or rolling pin.

Once the cake is established have the child push the candles/cut straws (of whatever size, length, and color desired) into the play-doh, and decorate as wanted (sprinkle sequins or rice for sprinkles).

After you sing and blow out the candles, have the child remove the straws. With the straws that have “cake” stuck in them, have the child use an unbent paper clip/pipe cleaner (depending on straw width) and poke it out from the other end. Sometimes you can get it out by pinching at it after pushing a little out.

If working on utensil manipulation, have the child cut up the cake with a plastic knife, serve to a group (for socialization), and fake eat with a plastic fork.

Spelling Push Ups

Use the construction paper, the pen and the scissors to cut out letters of the alpha-bet. You will need more than 1 of each letter. You can also use pre-cut letters.

Spread the letters on the floor or a mat in a random order. Help the child lay prone on the therapy ball. The child should be able to touch the floor. Instruct the child to use his hands and reach out to grab one letter at a time, then to walk back and place the letter in front of them. After the child gets all the letters he needed, he can spell the word.

You can also use magnetic letters and a magnetic board, or use math equations where the child has to walk out and grab the correct answer.