Flying Unicorn

Step 1: Cut out a picture of a unicorn.

Step 2: Glue it on a paper plate.

Step 3: Hole punch around the edges of the plate.

Step 4: Lace string through each hole, and tie a knot to secure it in place.

Step 5: Option to curl the strings, add jewels, or color the unicorn for more fine motor opportunities.

Step 6: Watch the strands fly in the air as you spin & wave it around! Enjoy!

Puppy Tug Toys

Preparation:

Step 1: Lay out an old shirt flat on the table. Optional: Draw shapes on the shirt with non-toxic markers to address pre-writing skills.

Step 2: Take fabric scissors and begin to cut strips to your desired length. Maintain approximately 2-inches of width.

Step 3: Take one of those strips & use it to tie a group of 3 strips together. Make sure to leave approximately 2-inches from the end.

Step 4: Braid the 3 strips.

Step 5: Take another strip & use it to tie the braid together at the bottom.

Tips:

  1. Use scissors that match your child’s hand dominance.
  2. Hold the fabric in place as they cut.
  3. Use 3 various colors of fabric to make teaching them braiding skills easier.

As always, please provide assistance and supervision as needed.

Share your creation with your lovable dog & enjoy!

Buttoning Board

Buttoning is a fun fine motor skill to work on! It is more motivating when it involves our children’s favorite characters; in this case, Noodle & Pals from Super Simple Songs on YouTube!

Here, we created peek-a-boo buttoning boards that progressed from easy to more challenging buttoning skills.

Preparation:

Step 1: Cut up a piece of cardboard of your desired size (Our cardboard is the blue & white checkered print in the photo).

Step 2: Cut felt to your desired size. Ensure there will be enough overlap between the felt pages when you close the buttoning board.

Step 3: Glue the edge of the felt to the edges of the backside of the cardboard.

Step 4: Glue/sew the buttons on one side of one of the felt pages.

Step 5: Cut out slits to match the sizes of your buttons on the other felt page.

Step 6: Optional – take a marker & outline the edges of the button openings (the slits you just cut), so it makes it easier to visually identify the location of the buttonhole opening.

Step 7: Print, cut & glue on your child’s favorite character at the top of the cardboard sheet.

Tips and Grading Options:

Warm-Ups:

  1. Insert popsicle sticks through slits on a coffee cup lid.
  2. Insert coins into piggy banks.
  3. Pick out buttons from playdough.

To make it easier:

  1. Start with fewer buttons.
  2. Create larger buttoning hole openings.
  3. Highlight the buttoning hole openings by drawing around them (such as the black markings in the photo).
  4. Use larger buttons.
  5. Demonstrate how to button & use simple language.

To make it more challenging:

  1. Increase the number of buttons.
  2. Create smaller buttoning hole openings.
  3. Use smaller buttons.
  4. Use fabric with busy patterns.
  5. Use fabric with flimsier material.

As always, ensure safety in all activities. Provide assistance and supervision as needed.

Enjoy!

Button The Shapes

For this activity, you will first need to create the button container using plastic containers with lids. Use the scissors to pierce a hole in the lid.

Take one button and insert a 3-inch pipe cleaner through 2 of the button holes.

Insert each edge of the pipe cleaner through the lid hole that you pierced and twist the 2 edges together on the bottom of the lid. This will hold the button in place on the lid.

Close the container with the lid so the button is at the top of the container.

Using a marker, mark a shape on the container.

Cut out pieces of felt in the same shapes that you marked the containers with. You can also use fabric for this.

Using the scissors, cut holes in the middle of each shape.

Provide the child with the button containers and the felt shapes. Ask the child to sort the felt pieces and button them on the right container marked with the matching shape.

For grading, you can use different sized buttons or you can also use one container with no marked shape and have the child follow a pattern from a visual model (i.e. button a circle, a triangle, and a rectangle in a repeated order).

Build with Me

Build With Me - shapes

Step 1: Fold a construction paper in half and cut out shapes. This ensures that both you and your child have the exact same shapes to work with. To increase the challenge, cut out more shapes or cut out smaller shapes.
Step 2: Provide yourself with one set of shapes, and your child with the other set.
Step 3: Build a house with your set of shapes, then have your child replicate the exact structure with their set of shapes. To increase the challenge, have your child look away while you build your house.

Take note of the spacing between the shapes, the alignment of the shapes, and possible shape reversals and different orientations (i.e. Is the peak of your chimney closer to the left of the table, while your child’s is closer to the right of the table? Are there any shapes that are upside down? Does one house have a diamond and the other have a square for a door?). If there are any major differences, this is a great opportunity to identify them and work together to make corrections, while discussing why and how. Also, take note of how easy or challenging this was for them. Provide assistance, as needed.

Now, to get to building — enjoy!